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the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
. the assembly will hear now and address by barack obama, president of the united states of america. a request for a call to -- his recognize his excellency. [applause] on behalf of the general assembly, i am honored to welcome to the united nations, barack obama. and to invite him to address the assembly. >> mr. president, secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grand valley california. the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, he joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria. from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, a riding on a cargo ship. as america's representative, w
united states assistance packages focused on developing the institutions of liberty, the rule of law and property rights. >> we believe that freedom and self-determination are not unique to one culture. isn't that simply american values or western values? they are universal values. and even as there will be huge challenges to come, i am convinced that ultimately, government is for the people, by the people. it is more likely to bring about the stability, prosperity and individual opportunity to serve as a basis for peace and our world. >> a october 3, mitt romney and president obama will meet in their first presidential debate, moderate. watch on c-span. your reaction, calls, e-mails and tweets after the debate. follow online at c-span.org. >> george washington university hosted a discussion yesterday on oil and gas production in the persian gulf. focusing mostly iraq. they speak about tensions between saudi arabia and iran. -- for the fall semester. and i would just mention in the way of an advertisement that we will be having our next program on october 23. it will be on jordan. jo
this country faces the starkest choice for president of the united states that has in that least my lifetime. that means in all of your lifetime. but for all the talk governor romney and congressman ryan have engaged in, they do not have the courage yet to tell you what their policies for this nation really are. it will shock you, i have the courage to tell you this morning with their policies are. [laughter] it's amazing if you listen to them. they talk so much about how they care about medicare. you would think it was a republican idea the way they talk about it. you think it was republicans supporting it. they talk about how they want to preserve it. they do it sincerely and talk about how they sincerely want to preserve and protect the benefits for all those people, guaranteeing all those people on medicare now, the 30 million seniors that nothing will change. if you listen to them these days, you would think that had been a republican plan all along. that's what they say and that is what they exude believe, and these are facts. they don't tell you that there fan with a meat -- their pla
be accurately described as young. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights and same-sex marriage issues. she has done such a good job in describing these cases. the two points i would make about same-sex and voting rights act cases is why would the justices get involved because these cases are not on the docket. the court family takes only one out of 100 cases. but doma has been invalidated by a federal court of appeals. if we're going to strike down a federal statute, that is our job, the supreme court's job. the voting rights act cases, several of them come on appeal. generally, you have to ask the supreme court to grant review in your case. but there are tiny slivers of cases in the united states code that allow them to go to the supreme court could but the voting rights cases they almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. they have a lot of interest in this issu
. it should happen i very local level, from a council level up to the president of the united states. i think what this election is about, if we're going to frame the debate with respect to black americans, to me, this election is about why is it that in 1960, we had 36% of black males who were incarcerated in 1960. i was reading the moynihan report, which the deceased daniel patrick moynihan wrote for president johnson about the state of black america as he sought in 1964. -- as he saw it in 1964. today, we have 55% of blacks in prison and in 1964, when he wrote this report to give to president johnson, he said the biggest thing he saw, the crisis affecting black americans was the breakdown of black families. at the time, yet 23% of black americans being born into -- you had a 23% of black americans being born into single-family -- single-parent families and today it is 73%. today, the issue is crime and why are so many black males being killed in chicago and philadelphia and the breakdown of the family. whoever you are going to vote for president or on the local level, you should ask how ar
follow that up. the israeli government, the prime minister, at least, has challenged the united states to define a red line or else is would be able to act on its own without clearing anything with the united states. this sounds to me like an ultimatum. is that what it was? was a governnt of israel giving us an ultimatum? was that wise? >> look, israel was in my portfolio. i have traveled there 13 times. i have had hundreds of meetings with israeli officials. we are in lock step with them on how far iran is toward getting a nuclear weapon capability. we are in step with them on the objective of preventing iran from getting a nuclear weapon. they do not have the same military capability of the united states has. they do not believe they can wait as long as we can. we need to work together to align our clocks. president netanyahu is expressing concerns. the president shares those concerns. it is a huge threat to israel and the interest of the united states. this president has made clear that all options will be considered to address that. the current israeli government would like the u.s
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9